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Five cloud migration mistakes that will sink a business

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By Jon-Michael C. Brook, Principal, Guide Holdings, LLC

Today, with the growing popularity of cloud computing, there exists a wealth of resources for companies that are considering—or are in the process of—migrating their data to the cloud. From checklists to best practices, the Internet teems with advice. But what about the things you shouldn’t be doing? The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry, and so, too, will your cloud migration unless you manage to avoid these common cloud mistakes:

“The Cloud Service Provider (CSP) will do everything.”

Cloud computing offers significant advantages—cost, scalability, on-demand service and infinite bandwidth. And the processes, procedures, and day-to-day activities a CSP delivers provides every cloud customer–regardless of size–with the capabilities of Fortune 50 IT staff. But nothing is idiot proof. CSPs aren’t responsible for everything–they are only in charge of the parts they can control based on the shared responsibility model and expect customers to own more of the risk mitigation.

Advice: Take the time upfront to read the best practices of the cloud you’re deploying to. Follow cloud design patterns and understand your responsibilities–don’t trust that your cloud service provider will take care of everything. Remember, it is a shared responsibility model.

“Cryptography is the panacea; data-in-motion, data-at-rest and data-in-transit protection works the same in the cloud.”

Cybersecurity professionals refer to the triad balance: Confidentiality, Integrity and Availability. Increasing one decreases the other two. In the cloud, availability and integrity are built into every service and even guaranteed with Service Level Agreements (SLAs).The last bullet in the confidentiality chamber involves cryptography, mathematically adjusting information to make it unreadable without the appropriate key. However, cryptography works differently in the cloud. Customers expect service offerings will work together, and so the CSP provides the “80/20” security with less effort (i.e. CSP managed keys).

Advice: Expect that while you must use encryption for the cloud, there will be a learning curve. Take the time to read through the FAQs and understand what threats each architectural option really opens you up to.

“My cloud service provider’s default authentication is good enough.”

One of cloud’s tenets is self-service. CSPs have a duty to protect not just you, but themselves and everyone else that’s virtualized on their environment. One of the early self-service aspects is authentication—the act of proving you are who you say you are. There are three ways to accomplish this proof: 1) Reply with something you know (i.e., password); 2) Provide something you have (i.e., key or token); or 3) Produce something you are (i.e., a fingerprint or retina scan). These are all commonplace activities. For example, most enterprise systems require a password with a complexity factor (upper/lower/character/number), and even banks now require customers to enter additional password codes received as text messages. These techniques are imposed to make the authentication stronger, more reliable and with wider adoption. Multi-factor authentication uses more than one of them.

Advice: Cloud Service Providers offer numerous authentication upgrades, including some sort of multi-factor authentication option—use them.

“Lift and shift is the clear path to cloud migration.”

Cloud cost advantages evaporate quickly due to poor strategic decisions or architectural choices. A lift-and-shift approach in moving to cloud is where existing virtualized images or snapshots of current in-house systems are simply transformed and uploaded onto a Cloud Service Provider’s system. If you want to run the exact same system in-house rented on an IaaS platform, it will cost less money to buy a capital asset and depreciate the hardware over three years.  The lift-and-shift approach ignores the elastic scalability to scale up and down on demand, and doesn’t use rigorously tested cloud design patterns that result in resiliency and security. There may be systems within a design that are appropriate to be an exact copy, however, placing an entire enterprise architecture directly onto a CSP would be costly and inefficient.

Advice: Invest the time up front to redesign your architecture for the cloud, and you will benefit greatly.

“Of course, we’re compliant.”

Enterprise risk and compliance departments have decades of frameworks, documentation and mitigation techniques. Cloud-specific control frameworks are less than five years old, but are solid and are continuing to be understood each year.

However, adopting the cloud will need special attention, especially when it comes to non-enterprise risks such as an economic denial of service (credit card over-the-limit), third-party managed encryption keys that potentially give them access to your data (warrants/eDiscovery) or compromised root administrator account responsibilities (CSP shutting down your account and forcing physical verification for reinstatement).

Advice: These items don’t have direct analogs in the enterprise risk universe. Instead, the understandings must expand, especially in highly regulated industries. Don’t face massive fines, operational downtime or reputational losses by not paying attention to a widened risk environment.

Jon-Michael C. Brook, Principal at Guide Holdings, LLC, has 20 years of experience in information security with such organizations as Raytheon, Northrop Grumman, Booz Allen Hamilton, Optiv Security and Symantec. He is co-chair of CSA’s Top Threats Working Group and the Cloud Broker Working Group, and contributor to several additional working groups. Brook is a Certified Certificate of Cloud Security Knowledge+ (CCSK+) trainer and Cloud Controls Matrix (CCM) reviewer and trainer.

The opinions expressed within this article are the personal opinions of the author. The facts and opinions appearing in the article do not reflect the views of CISO MAG and CISO MAG does not assume any responsibility or liability for the same!

This blog was originally published at www.cloudsecurityalliance.org and has been posted here with their permission.

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